PRE-MOTHER’S DAY SPECIAL CLASS

PARTNER EXERCISE  FOR MOMS AND OTHERS – MAY 13

Taught by Annette Loquercio and Helane Hurwith

We are offering a special class the day before Mother’s Day, on Saturday, May 13, for Moms  and others to workout with a partner.  Participants (age 15 and older) will be shown exercises that are fun and challenging, and specifically designed for two people to do together, This could be an interesting way to spend time with mom (or a friend) and get a good workout in the process.  Two times are offered:  12 noon and 2pm.  No set cost – pay whatever you want. Limited to 8 participants.  Call to register 847-251-6834 or email [email protected]

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HIP PAIN (from ACE Certified January 2017)

Hip pain is a common problem for sedentary and non-sedentary individuals. Chronic pain is a sign that there is irritation or injury at a site. There are a multitude of conditions that can cause hip pain, from trochanteric bursitis to osteoarthritis. The great news is that movement is the panacea for many of these conditions.

In injury assessment, we talk first about the mechanism of injury. This is very simply a description of the condition(s) that led to the injury. By understanding the mechanism of injury, we better understand the injury itself and how to use exercise to heal, not harm.

First, visit a doctor –

Though chronic hip pain is frequently improved through movement training, other causes of hip pain can be caused by serious injury or unassociated with musculoskeletal tissue. Make sure you visit a doctor to rule out conditions that require medical intervention. Here are three common causes of hip pain:

  1. Chronic Sitting – The average American sits 13 hours a day. This staggering amount of inactivity causes an imbalance of the hip musculature. The hip flexors remain in a shortened position, while the glutes and deep hip rotators remain elongated. Add to that chronic dehydration and the result is tissue that more closely resembles beef jerky than healthy muscle tissue.

This tissue lacks the necessary flexibility and elasticity to allow for smooth and efficient movement. It tears more easily and becomes overstressed more easily, and the rigidity of the tissue leads to more rubbing against bone and bursae.

  1. Strength Imbalance – A strength imbalance is not the same as tightness or inelasticity. A strength imbalance occurs most often when one’s exercise regimen is consistent and unvaried. Runners are an excellent example of this type of athlete. Whether running 12 miles a week or 45 miles per week, runners often feel like they don’t need more or different exercise. The repetition of the same movement without variation builds strength in some muscles, while neglecting others. This imbalance puts an unnatural amount of strain on those muscles, resulting in overuse injury. This type of injury is often found at the tendinous origins in the pelvic complex
  2.  Skeletal Imbalance –Here, skeletal imbalance refers to the uneven stature or movement pattern that many clients demonstrate, which can be caused by so many things, including old injuries and leg-length discrepancies. When movements are not even or balanced bilaterally, one side will be the victim of added pressure, tissue friction or workload. These clients often fall victim to conditions such as bursitis or piriformis syndrome.

Fortunately, the fix for many of these hip issues can be found in the right movements.

Fix: Mobility –The best fix for immobility is mobility. Focus on improving range of motion of the hip flexors and hip rotators with gentle dynamic movement.  Your trainer can show you how to do this properly.

Fix: Elasticity – Improving the elasticity of that beef jerky-like tissue is best achieved through a combination of homework and loaded movement training. Two to three hours of movement each week is not enough to undo 100+ hours of inactivity each week—more focus is necessary.  Daily stretching, never sitting for more than one hour at a time, and drinking water throughout the day are good habits to form.

GARDENING – THE ORIGINAL MIND-BODY EXERCISE (from ACSM Health and Fitness Journal)

Long before mind-body fitness became fashionable, gardeners understood the zen of nurturing their harvest. Gardening relieves stress through the quiet focus of communing with nature. In a complex world, the simple act of planting seeds and watching them grow is therapeutic. Use this opportunity to practice some meditative breathing. Sit on a chair or bench in good posture. Place your feet flat on the ground and your hands on your lap. Inhale through your nose as you count up to four; pause at the top of your breath and slowly exhale through your mouth as you count down from four. Repeat, each time adding a count until you reach a count of eight. This will help relax your mind and body and make an excellent pregardening or postgardening ritual.