NEW LOCATION – 350 LINDEN AVENUE, WILMETTE

 We finally moved to our new studio on Saturday, June 26.  Clients and trainers have been very enthusiastic and seem pleased with the new space.  It will take a little getting used to as the physical layout is very different from the old studio.  The ambience is a cleaner, more contemporary look, with full-spectrum lighting and better designed floor space.  New equipment includes a TrueStretch (stretching apparatus) and a medicine ball rebounder.  A new Cybex treadmill is on order.

 Grand Opening – Wednesday, July 21, 5PM-7PM

There will be a ribbon-cutting ceremony organized by the Wilmette Chamber of Commerce at 5PM, after which we will host an open house with snacks and refreshments.  Please stop by to help us celebrate the grand opening of our new facility.  Everyone is invited.  We will have a drawing for a free fitness assessment, so bring your friends.

 FREE INTRODUCTORY YOGA CLASSES – Saturday, July 17, 9AM-10AM and Monday, July 19, 4-5PM

Jenny Klein, our yoga instructor, has agreed to offer a complimentary one-hour yoga classes to introduce potential students to the practice of yoga.  Space is limited, so register as soon as possible by calling us at 847-251-6834. First-come, first-served.! Please register for only one of the free classes, so everyone has a chance to experience Jenny’s type of teaching. Regular 6-week classes will be offered starting July 24.

NEW!  EARLY BIRD CLASS – 6AM-7AM, Tuesday and Thursday. Starts August 3 and 5

 We have new instructor, Angi Catalano, who is offering a unique new class, “YOPI”.  This will be a fusion of Yoga and Pilates, but each will be taught separately for 30 minutes each.  You will get the benefit of both exercise modalities in each session.  Both Yoga and Pilates movements are designed to stretch, strengthen and balance the body through focused movement and breathing; thereby, increasing flexibility, improving muscle tone and increasing energy and endurance. Classes will run 6-weeks; the cost is $108 for the 6-weeks.  (Drop-in rate is $20/session). This might be a great way to start your day!

 SUMMER’S MOST FATTENING FOODS  (from WebMD)

 Summertime living may be easy, but if you’re not careful, summer’s fattening foods can really pack on the pounds. While most people are more active during the summer, it may not be enough to burn off all the extra calories from fattening summer treats.

 High-Fat Meats on the Barbecue

The bad news: barbecue can sabotage your waistline. A 20 ounce T-bone can weigh in at 1,540 calories and 124 g fat; an average cheeseburger has about 750 calories and 45 grams of fat; and pork or beef ribs? They come from the fattiest part of the animal. The good news: You can go lean with cuts like pork tenderloin, skinless chicken breast, and lean ground beef.

Take Me Out to the Ball Game

Hot dogs and sausages are favorite summer treats for many of us, but you might want to save them for baseball games. It’s not just about fat or calories (after all, you can choose lower fat varieties) but hot dogs, bratwursts, sausages and most dogs are high in sodium. A typical hot dog has 280 calories, 15 grams of fat, and 1,250 mg of sodium, while a 6-ounce kielbasa has 330 calories, 24 grams of fat, and 1,590 mg sodium.

Mayonnaise-Based Salads

A small half-cup portion of typical potato salad has 180 calories and 12 grams of fat; the same amount of coleslaw has about 150 calories and 8 grams of fat. To cut calories, try making your salads with light mayonnaise; or mix mayo with low-fat yogurt, light sour cream, or chicken stock. Or why not try a German-style potato salad, using more vinegar than oil? Then toss lots of veggies into any salad to increase the fiber and nutrients

Frozen Concoctions

Sweet, fruity alcoholic drinks (the kind often served with an umbrella) may go down easy, but the calories add up in a hurry. A piña colada can range from 245-490 calories, a daiquiri from 300-800 calories, and a Long Island iced tea can set you back 520 calories or more — with much of it from sugar. Instead of high calorie drinks, try wine, a wine spritzer, or a mixed drink with seltzer and a splash of 100% fruit juice.

Satisfying Thirst Quenchers

Staying hydrated is essential in summer, but those cold drinks can wreak havoc with your waistline. Be careful what you choose — if you’re drinking 12-ounce containers of sweet tea, sweetened soda, energy drinks, juice drinks, or beer, you’re probably taking in about 150 calories a pop. Smoothies, milkshakes and cold coffee concoctions can go much higher. Keep liquids in check and drink water or light versions of your favorite quenchers.

Refreshing Frozen Treats

A cup of soft-serve ice cream can have 380 calories and 22 grams of fat. You don’t need to give up frozen treats, just pass on the giant portions or high fat toppings. Look for frozen desserts like sherbet, fudge bars, fruit bars, or other treats under 150 calories per serving or fruit desserts like strawberry shortcake.

Mindless Munching on Snacks

A handful of any kind of snack won’t do much harm, but eat too much and it can sabotage your diet. Each ounce of potato chips or cheese puffs is roughly 160 calories and 10 grams of fat. Cheese nachos will set you back 692 calories (plus 38 g fat and 1,632 mg sodium); and a 10-cup box of movie theater popcorn has 550 calories, 31 g fat, and 972 mg sodium. Try snacking on fruits, veggies with light dip, or small portions of fat-free popcorn.

Finger-Licking Fried Chicken

A bucket of fried chicken is an easy way to feed a crowd, but it can wreak havoc on your waistline (and arteries), especially when you eat more than one. So forgo fried and toss boneless, skinless chicken breasts on the grill. A 3.5 oz. skinned chicken breast has only 167 calories and 7 grams of fat, compared to a KFC fried chicken breast with 360 calories and 21 g fat. Add flavor with marinades, spice rubs, or top it with fresh salsa.

 BROWN RICE VS. WHITE RICE- WHICH IS BETTER? (Modified from WebMD)

Replacing white rice in your diet with brown rice may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study.

The finding is important because the consumption of white rice in the United States has increased dramatically in the past few decades, and about 18 million Americans have type 2 diabetes.

Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health say eating two or more servings of brown rice weekly seems to be associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, they report, eating five or more servings of white rice per week is associated with an increased risk.

Researchers estimate that replacing 50 grams daily of white rice (uncooked, equivalent to a one-third serving) with the same amount of brown rice would lower the risk of type 2 diabetes by 16%.  Replacing the same amount of white rice with other whole grains, such as barley and wheat, is associated with a 36% reduced risk. The study is published in the online journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

White rice is created by removing  the bran and germ portions of brown rice. The authors say that more than 70% of rice eaten in the U.S. is white. White rice has a higher glycemic index than brown rice, the researchers say. That index is a measure of how fast a particular food raises blood glucose levels, compared with the same amount of glucose. Brown rice, the researchers say, often does not generate as fast an increase in blood sugar levels after a meal.

They recommend replacing white rice and other refined grains with brown rice to try to prevent type 2 diabetes.